Vitamin D supplements do not prevent fractures


  • Mary Corcoran
  • Univadis Medical News
El acceso al contenido completo es sólo para profesionales sanitarios registrados. El acceso al contenido completo es sólo para profesionales sanitarios registrados.

Findings from a new meta-analysis examining the effect of vitamin D supplementation on fractures, falls, and bone density have prompted its authors to suggest that guidelines on vitamin D supplementation for bone health should be changed. 

The review found vitamin D had no effect on total fracture (36 trials; n=44,790; relative risk [RR] 1.00; 95% CI 0.93-1.07), hip fracture (20 trials; n=36,655; RR 1.11; 95% CI 0.97-1.26) or falls (37 trials; n=34,144; RR 0.97; 95% CI 0.93-1.02). Furthermore, there were no differences between the effects of higher and lower doses of vitamin D. 

“Since the last major review of the evidence in 2014, more than 30 randomised controlled trials on vitamin D and bone health have been published, nearly doubling the evidence base available. Our meta-analysis finds that vitamin D does not prevent fractures, falls or improve bone mineral density, whether at a high or low dose. Clinical guidelines should be changed to reflect these findings. On the strength of existing evidence, we believe there is little justification for more trials of vitamin D supplements looking at musculoskeletal outcomes,” said lead author Dr Mark J Bolland from the University of Auckland, New Zealand. 

The findings are published in the Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.