Use of consumer-facing wearables and apps for atrial fibrillation screening


  • Heather Mason
  • Univadis Medical News
El acceso al contenido completo es sólo para profesionales sanitarios registrados. El acceso al contenido completo es sólo para profesionales sanitarios registrados.

Results from a web-based survey of healthcare professionals (HCPs) indicates a perceived value in using new diagnostic resources to screen for atrial fibrillation (AF). 

The analysis published in the European Journal of Internal Medicine included 588 HCPs who answered the survey, which aimed to explore the current views, practice, and organisational issues around AF screening through the use of watches, smartphones, and other devices, commonly named ‘wearables’.

Overall, 57 per cent of  HCPs currently advise wearables/apps for AF detection in their patients, but the type of device recommended was different: approximately 46 per cent advised handheld (portable) single-lead dedicated ECG devices, but only 10-15 per cent recommended wristband monitors or smartphone apps. About 45 per cent of HCPs perceive a potential role for AF screening in people aged >65 years or in those with risk factors.

Despite the great potential of wearables/apps, most HCPs believe that mass consumer-initiated screening for AF using these technologies is not possible yet. Before being recommended, there remains a need to better define suitable individuals for screening and also an appropriate mechanism for managing positive results, the findings suggest.