Thiazide use and fracture risk in patients with dementia


  • Mary Corcoran
  • Univadis Medical News
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A new study has found long-term thiazide use is associated with a reduced risk of low-energy fractures (LEF) in community-dwelling people with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). 

The study, which was carried out by the University of Eastern Finland, compared 10,416 community-dwelling persons diagnosed with AD who had suffered a LEF with 31,099 matched controls without a fracture. Current thiazide use was observed in 10.5 per cent of LEF cases and 12.5 per cent of controls. 

The researchers found current thiazide use was associated with a decreased risk of LEF (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0.83; 95% CI 0.77-0.88). When current use was assessed according to the duration of use, only use exceeding three years was associated with a reduced risk of fractures. The association of thiazide use and reduced fracture risk disappeared approximately one month after the treatment was discontinued. 

Presenting the findings in Osteoporosis International, the authors said the results "may have implications for the choice of antihypertensive medications in this vulnerable patient group with an increased background risk for falls and fractures due to dementia disorder".