STEMI: women wait longer than men to get help


  • Mary Corcoran
  • Univadis Medical News
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A new study which investigated the gender differences in both patient and system delay for primary percutaneous coronary intervention among those with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) has found that women wait longer than men to get help. 

Researchers compared patient delay from symptom onset to first medical contact and system delay from first medical contact to percutaneous coronary intervention-facilitated reperfusion in 967 women and 3,393 men treated between 2000 and 2016 in a Swiss STEMI treatment network. 

They found female gender was independently associated with greater patient delay than male gender (P=.02), accounting for a 12 per cent greater total ischaemic time among women in 2012-2016 (median 215 vs. 192 minutes, P<.001 the authors pointed out that in contrast to men clinical signs of on-going chest discomfort do not predict delays women suggesting female stemi patients are less likely attribute symptoms a condition requiring urgent treatment.>

There were no gender differences in the timely delivery of care by health professionals. 

In-hospital mortality was significantly higher in women (5.9%) than men (4.5%) during the study period, however, delays were not associated with in-hospital mortality after correcting for multiple factors. 

The research is published in European Heart Journal: Acute Cardiovascular Care.