Season of birth linked to cardiovascular disease mortality


  • Mary Corcoran
  • Univadis Medical News
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A new study, which investigated whether the time of the year an individual is born is linked to their risk of dying from cardiovascular disease (CVD) in later life, has found those born between March and July had a slight but significant increase in CVD-specific mortality. 

The study, published in the BMJ, evaluated the associations between birth month, season and overall and CVD mortality in 116,911 women from the Nurses Health Study in the United States. 

A total of 43,248 deaths were documented over the 38-year study period including 8,360 CVD-related deaths. 

There was no significant association observed between birth month, birth season and overall mortality. However, the authors reported that increased CVD mortality was observed among participants born from March to July compared to those born in November. Individuals born in April had the highest CVD mortality, and those born in December had the lowest. Furthermore, women born in spring and summer had a higher CVD mortality than women born in the autumn. 

“This study supports that the associations of foetal and early life factors with cardiovascular disease mortality could relate to a small but real seasonal effect of foetal or early life factors in later life,” the authors concluded.