Report highlights ‘massive’ under-treatment of osteoporosis


  • Mary Corcoran
  • Univadis Medical News
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A new report has highlighted significant under-treatment of osteoporosis in six European countries. 

The International Osteoporosis Foundation report, Broken bones, broken lives: A roadmap to solve the fragility fracture crisis in Europeexamined the burden associated with fragility fractures in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Sweden and the UK. 

It found between 60 and 85 per cent of women aged 50 years or older with osteoporosis do not receive treatment after a fragility fracture. The report also states that the number of fragility fractures in the six countries will increase by 23 per cent by 2030. It identifies post-fracture coordinated care models such as fracture liaison services as a cost-effective way to reduce further fractures. 

"It is unacceptable that the men and women in Europe who are at high risk of breaking a bone due to osteoporosis still remain undiagnosed and untreated. This neglect comes at a huge cost. Patients face the burden of disability, lost quality of life and dependence on caregivers, while health authorities bear massive health economic costs," said Professor Cyrus Cooper, IOF President. 

The report is being discussed at the World Congress on Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases, which is taking place in France this week.