Pediatric myopia: several interventions are available to slow progression

  • Walline JJ & al.
  • Cochrane Database Syst Rev
  • 13 ene. 2020

  • de Emily Willingham, PhD
  • Clinical Essentials
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Takeaway

  • Many options are available for interventions to slow the progression of pediatric myopia.
  • This Cochrane review identifies topical antimuscarinics, multifocal lenses (contacts or glasses), and mentions orthokeratology contact lenses as well.

Why this matters

  • This review updates the conclusions of a 2011 review that topical antimuscarinics might be effective but were not commercially available at the time.

Key results

  • In 41 studies involving 6772 children, the following interventions were identified as potentially slowing progression:
    • With moderate-certainty evidence:
      • antimuscarinic eye drops (e.g., atropine, pirenzepine);
      • multifocal lenses (contacts or glasses);
      • orthokeratology contact lenses; and
      • combinations of drops and multifocal lenses.
  • They also found low-certainty evidence for bifocal soft contact lenses and spherical aberration soft contacts.
  • Undercorrection might risk more progression.
  • The risk with drops is blurred vision, light sensitivity, itching, discomfort, development of nodules and bumps.

Study design

  • A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.
  • Funding: Ohio State University; US National Institutes of Health; National Institute for Health Research, UK.

Limitations

  • The limitations are those of the included studies.