Op-ed: does having COVID-19 confer immunity?

  • Kirkcaldy RD & al.
  • JAMA
  • 11 may. 2020

  • de Miriam Davis, PhD
  • Clinical Essentials
El acceso al contenido completo es sólo para profesionales sanitarios registrados. El acceso al contenido completo es sólo para profesionales sanitarios registrados.

Takeaway

  • JAMA op-ed authors discuss the early limited evidence of postinfection immunity after COVID-19 recovery and highlight current knowledge gaps.

Why this matters

  • If COVID-19 recovery affects immunity to or severity of reinfection, those factors could play into public health decisions about social distancing.
  • Someone with immunity also might be able to donate convalescent plasma.

Key points

  • What is known:
    • After infection with SARS-CoV-2, IgM and IgG antibodies are detectable within days to weeks of symptom onset in most individuals.
    • With most other coronaviruses, concentrations of IgG remain high for about 4-5 months and then decline gradually over the next 2-3 years.
    • A study of 9 patients with COVID-19 found higher antibody titers with greater clinical severity.
    • A study of 4 rhesus macaques deliberately infected with SARS-CoV-2 found that the animals did not become reinfected 28 days later when they were rechallenged with the virus.
  • Gaps in knowledge:
    • The durability and duration of neutralizing antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 is unknown.
    • The relationship between antibody response and clinical improvement is unclear.
    • Whether higher antibody titers correlate with clinical improvement is unknown.
    • How long virus shedding persists is not known.