Men with diabetes could be at higher risk of back pain


  • Mary Corcoran
  • Univadis Medical News
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Findings from a new study suggest men with diabetes could be at a higher risk of developing chronic lower back pain (LBP). 

The study, published in the BMJ Open, examined the association between diabetes and the subsequent risk of chronic LBP among participants of the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT2; 1995-1997) and HUNT3 (2006-2008) surveys of Nord-Trøndelag County in Norway. 

A total of 6,802 people reported chronic LBP at baseline in HUNT2, while 18,972 people were without chronic LBP. 

Overall, 2,105 women and 1,275 men reported chronic LBP at the end of follow-up. The study found men with diabetes who did not have chronic LBP at baseline had a 43 per cent increased risk of chronic LBP at the end of the 11-year follow-up. However, there was no increased risk among women with diabetes. 

No association was established between diabetes and recurrence or persistence of chronic LBP after 11 years in either sex.

Diabetes is known to be associated with a number of complications and a higher risk of other diseases such as polyneuropathy, kidney and cardiovascular diseases. The results of this study indicate that chronic LBP might be considered another candidate for this list of associated disorders in men, the authors said.