Impact of a reduction in sugar-sweetened beverage consumption on health outcomes


  • Heather Mason
  • Univadis Medical News
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A relatively small reduction in sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption could lead to a substantial decrease in diabetes incidence, cardiovascular events, and mortality in Argentina, according to a modelling study published in PLoS Medicine.

The researchers developed and updated an Argentinian version of the Cardiovascular Disease Policy Model to estimate cardiovascular health outcomes and used it to determine the potential impact of a reduction in soda consumption on diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and mortality among adults 35–94 years of age over a 10-year period (2015–2024).

A 10% reduction in soda consumption (the most consumed SSB) is projected to avoid between 13,300 to 27,700 diabetes cases, 2,500 to 5,100 myocardial infarctions, and 2,700 to 5,600 all-cause deaths over a 10-year period. The largest reductions in diabetes and cardiovascular events were observed in the youngest age group modelled (35–44 years) for both men and women. More events could be avoided in men compared to women in all age groups.

These results support the implementation of policies to reduce SSB consumption, such as a soda tax, which could also provide a new source of public funds to support healthy lifestyles.