High job demands lead to increased weight gain in women


  • Mary Corcoran
  • Univadis Medical News
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New research has identified a link between high job demands and an increased risk of weight gain in women, with researchers saying efforts to reduce stress in at-risk patients could help lower their risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

Researchers examined data on 3,872 Swedish women and men from the population-based Västerbotten Intervention Programme to determine if baseline and prolonged exposure to high job demands and low decision latitude were associated with major weight gain, defined as at least 10 per cent of baseline weight. 

They found that both men and women with a low degree of control in their work more frequently gained considerable weight in the course of the study. High job demand was a risk factor for major weight gain in women but not in men and was more pronounced in women who were overweight at baseline.

Writing in the International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Healththe authors said: "The importance of these findings is likely to go beyond the risk of unhealthy weight gain, since the identification of vulnerable groups and gender-sensitive preventive efforts to reduce job strain have the potential to not only reduce weight gain, but also risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes."