First pregnancy after robot-assisted uterus transplant


  • Mary Corcoran
  • Univadis Medical News
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Scientists in Sweden are reporting the first pregnancy following a robot-assisted uterine transplant. 

The patient underwent the transplant in 2017 as part of an ongoing research project on uterine transplantation with robot-assisted surgery at Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg. The woman has an estimated spring delivery date. 

Researchers involved in the project say they recently performed the fifth and sixth transplants of a maximum of ten in the project. Results to date suggest the donor is primarily affected by the changes brought by the new technique.

"We haven't saved as much time as we thought we would, but we gained in other ways. The donor loses less blood, the hospital stay is shorter, and the patient feels better after surgery," said Mats Brännström, Professor of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at Sahlgrenska Academy. "I think robotic surgery has a great future in this area," Brännström added. 

To date, a total of 13 babies have been born after uterine transplantation worldwide. Eight infants have been born under the aegis of the Sahlgrenska Academy research, in addition to two children in the United States, and one child in each of Brazil, Serbia, and India.