Erectile dysfunction: you are what you eat


  • Dawn O'Shea
  • Univadis Medical News
El acceso al contenido completo es sólo para profesionales sanitarios registrados. El acceso al contenido completo es sólo para profesionales sanitarios registrados.

Diet may protect against erectile dysfunction (ED), suggests research published in JAMA Network Open.

The population-based prospective cohort study included men from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study of US male health professionals aged 40-75 years without a diagnosis of ED at baseline. A food frequency questionnaire was used to determine nutrient and food intake every four years.

A total of 21,469 men were included in the analysis. During a mean follow-up of 10.8 years, there were 968 incident ED cases among men younger than 60; 3,703 among men aged 60; and 4,793 cases among men aged ≥70 years.

Men younger than 60 years and in the highest category of the Mediterranean Diet score had the lowest relative risk of incident ED compared with men in the lowest category (hazard ratio [HR] 0.78; 95% CI 0.66-0.92).

Higher Mediterranean diet scores were also inversely associated with incident ED among older men (age 60-69: HR 0.82; 95% CI 0.76-0.89; age ≥70: HR 0.93; 95% CI 0.86-1.00).

Men scoring in the highest quintile of the Alternative Healthy Eating Index 2010 also had a lower risk of incident ED, particularly among men age