E-scooter injuries, admissions zooming up among young adults

  • Namiri NK & al.
  • JAMA Surg
  • 8 ene. 2020

  • de Jenny Blair, MD
  • Clinical Essentials
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Takeaway

  • Injuries associated with electric scooters (e-scooters) are on the rise, and one-third are head injuries—twice the rate that bicyclists experience.
  • Authors urge efforts to promote helmet use.

Why this matters

  • E-scooter availability in urban settings is rising, and the public-health effects are not yet clear.
  • This study of a national database found similar results to those of a recent 2-center case series.

Key results

  • During the study period, an estimated  39,113 e-scooter injuries occurred (95% CI, 28,151-50,074).
  • Body parts injured in 2018:
    • Head: 32% (95% CI, 26%-38%).
    • Upper extremity: 26% (95% CI, 21%-31%).
    • Lower extremity: 32% (95% CI, 27%-37%).
  • Both injuries and hospital admissions rose dramatically from 2017 to 2018.
  • Increases during study period among people aged 18-34 years:
    • Injuries: from 13% to 36% (P<.001>
    • Hospital admissions: from 10% to 44% (P=.02).
  • Absolute number of pediatric injuries rose, but children’s proportion of injuries vs other age groups fell.

Study design

  • Study of powered scooter injuries recorded in the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS), 2014-2018.
  • Outcomes: injury types, ages, incidences.
  • Funding: Anita and Kevan Del Grande.

Limitations

  • No data on collision scenario, alcohol, or helmet use.
  • May have inadvertently captured incidents associated with assisted-living scooters.