E-cigarettes linked to higher risk of stroke


  • Mary Corcoran
  • Univadis Medical News
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Use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) could significantly increase stroke risk according to the preliminary research to be presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2019 next week. 

In the largest study to date of its kind, researchers examined data from the 2016 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey, a database of more than 400,000 people in the United States. A total of 66,795 respondents reported ever regularly using e-cigarettes. The control group was composed of 343,856 respondents who reported that they never used e-cigarettes. 

Compared with non-users, e-cigarette users were younger, had a lower body mass index and a lower rate of diabetes. 

The researchers found e-cigarette users had significantly higher adjusted odds of stroke (odds ratio [OR] 1.71). The study also found e-cigarette use was linked to an increased risk of myocardial infarction (OR 1.59), angina or coronary heart disease (OR 1.4). 

Some 4.2 per cent of e-cigarette users reported having suffered a stroke. However, the study data did not show deaths attributable to e-cigarette use.

The American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2019 takes place from February 6 to February 8 in Hawaii.