Depression tied to benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

  • Hsu CL & al.
  • BMJ Open
  • 30 mar. 2019

  • de Kelli Whitlock Burton
  • Clinical Essentials
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Takeaway

  • Patients with depressive disorders were more likely to develop benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) than those without depressive disorders.
  • Risk was exacerbated in the presence of hyperthyroidism and systemic lupus erythematosus.

Why this matters

  • Prior studies on the association between BPPV and depression yielded conflicting results.

Study design

  • Study of 10,297 patients with depressive disorders and 41,188 patients without depressive disorders (control group).
  • Funding: National Science Council, Taiwan; Taipei Veterans General Hospital.

Key results

  • Median follow-up duration was 7.19 years for patients with depressive disorders and 7.22 years for those without.
  • 44 patients were diagnosed with BPPV in the depressive disorders group vs 99 patients in the control group (0.59 vs 0.33 per 1000 person-years; incidence rate ratio, 1.79; P=.002).
  • Risk for BPPV was significantly higher in patients with depressive disorders (HR, 1.55; P=.019).
  • Hyperthyroidism (HR, 3.75; P=.001) and systemic lupus erythematosus (HR, 3.47; P=.038) showed significant association with risk for BPPV in patients with depressive disorders.

Limitations

  • Retrospective design.
  • Lack of detailed information regarding medications administered for BPPV, tobacco use, alcohol consumption, head position in bed, and family history.

Coauthored with Antara Ghosh, PhD