Dementia: new findings may help identify at-risk patients


  • Mary Corcoran
  • Univadis Medical News
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New research could help to identify individuals at high risk of dementia who might benefit from early-targeted prevention. 

The study, published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal, determined the 10-year absolute risk estimates for dementia specific to age, sex and apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype by examining data on 104,537 people in Copenhagen, Denmark. 

The authors report that the 10-year absolute risk and adjusted hazard ratio for dementia increased by genotype, from ε22 to ε32 to ε33 to ε42 to ε43 to ε44, in both sexes across all age groups.

The association between dementia risk and APOE genotype was modified by age and sex. The absolute 10-year risk for ε44 genotype for dementia in women was 10 per cent at 60-69 years, 22 per cent at 70-79 years and 38 per cent at 80 years or older. In men, the corresponding figures were 8, 19 and 33 per cent.

The authors concluded that age, sex and APOE genotype can robustly identify high-risk groups for Alzheimer's disease and all dementia, and said these groups can potentially be targeted for preventive interventions.