Coronary artery bypass graft surgery: aspirin may be beneficial


  • Mary Corcoran
  • Univadis Medical News
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The use of aspirin before and after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery is associated with an 18 to 34 per cent reduced mortality risk after four years, according to new findings. 

Researchers examined data on 9,584 patients who received cardiac surgery in three hospitals, selecting 4,132 individuals who underwent CABG. Among the studied patients, 76.5 per cent received preoperative aspirin while 92.3 per cent received postoperative aspirin. 

The authors found that among patients taking preoperative aspirin, four-year mortality was 14.8 per cent versus 18.1 per cent for those not taking preoperative aspirin, a statistically significant mortality reduction of 18 per cent (P=.0048). The difference was even greater when the researchers examined data on postoperative aspirin. Those taking aspirin post-operatively had a four-year mortality rate of 10.7 per cent compared with 16.2 per cent in the non-aspirin patients, a statistically significant mortality reduction of 34 per cent (P=.0029). 

Commenting on the findings, author, Professor Jianzhong Sun said: "We believe that all patients undergoing CABG should take aspirin before and after the procedure, except those for whom aspirin is contraindicated."

The findings were presented at this year's Euroanaesthesia congress in Copenhagen, Denmark.