Cancer mortality in the European Union


  • Mary Corcoran
  • Univadis Medical News
El acceso al contenido completo es sólo para profesionales sanitarios registrados. El acceso al contenido completo es sólo para profesionales sanitarios registrados.

New data published by the European Commission shows that in 2015, 1.3 million people died from cancer in the European Union (EU). The figure equates to more than a quarter (25.4%) of the total number of deaths in the region. 

In all EU Member States the share of deaths due to cancer among men was higher than the share for women. At EU level, cancer accounted for 28.7 per cent of deaths among men compared with 22.1 per cent for women in 2015. 

Slovenia and the Netherlands had the highest share of the total number of deaths due to cancer, exceeding 30 per cent. This peaked to 36.0 per cent among men in Slovenia, while among women it peaked at 27.7 per cent in Ireland and 27.8 per cent in Denmark.

Bulgaria and Romania had the lowest share of the total number of deaths due to cancer, at less than a fifth of all deaths. 

Among the EU Member States, the highest standardised death rates for cancer were recorded in Hungary, Croatia and Slovakia, each with rates of at least 320 per 100,000 inhabitants in 2015. Cyprus recorded the lowest standardised death rate for cancer among the Member States, 206.7 per 100,000 inhabitants.