Bisexual men at higher risk for cardiovascular disease


  • Mary Corcoran
  • Univadis Medical News
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Findings from a new study suggest bisexual men could be at higher risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), with the study’s authors calling for CVD and mental health screenings for men who identify as bisexual. 

The study included 7,731 men from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001-2012. Differences were analysed across four groups based on sexual identities namely; heterosexual men, gay men, bisexual men, and heterosexual men who have sex with men.

There were few differences in health behaviours, but the authors noted gay men reported lower binge drinking compared with heterosexual men. They found gay men, heterosexual men, and heterosexual men who have sex with men had similar CVD risk. However bisexual men had elevations in several risk factors including higher rates of mental distress, obesity, elevated blood pressure, and glycosylated haemoglobin relative to exclusively heterosexual men.  

“Clinicians should be educated about sexual minority health and should routinely screen bisexual men for mental distress as a risk factor for heart disease. This is particularly important as healthcare organisations increasingly include sexual orientation as part of demographic questionnaires in electronic health records, said lead author, Billy Caceres, from Columbia University in the US. 

The findings are published in LGBT Health.