Aspirin does not prolong healthy aging among older people


  • Mary Corcoran
  • Univadis Medical News
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Newly published findings from the international ASPirin in Reducing Events in the Elderly (ASPREE) trial suggest that daily low-dose aspirin does not prolong healthy living in older adults. 

The randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial enrolled 19,114 older people who were followed for an average of 4.7 years. Participants were randomly assigned to receive 100mg of enteric-coated aspirin or placebo.

The trial found the use of low-dose aspirin did not prolong disability-free survival among elderly participants over a period of five years. Aspirin was also associated with significantly higher risk of major haemorrhage and did not result in a significantly lower risk of cardiovascular disease than placebo.

Furthermore, the authors identified higher all-cause mortality among apparently healthy older adults who received daily aspirin than among those who received placebo. The increase in mortality was attributed primarily to cancer-related death.

They pointed out that other primary prevention trials of aspirin have not identified a similar result and said the mortality results reported here should be interpreted with caution.

The findings are published in three separate studies in the New England Journal of Medicine.