Acute pancreatitis linked to high BMI, partly mediated by triglycerides

  • Hansen SEJ & al.
  • J Clin Endocrinol Metab
  • 7 oct. 2019

  • de Craig Hicks
  • Clinical Essentials
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Takeaway

  • Increased risk for acute pancreatitis is associated with higher BMI, partly mediated by triglycerides.

Why this matters

  • Providers may be able to help patients avoid acute pancreatitis by reducing high BMI and triglyceride levels.

Study design

  • Researchers analyzed the health records of the participants from 2 prospective cohort studies (N=118,085; women, 55%; white, 100%; median age, 58 [range, 48-68] years), randomly selected from the Danish general population.
  • Funding: Novo Nordisk Foundation; Independent Research Fund Denmark; Copenhagen University Hospital; Chief Physician Johan Boserup and Lise Boserup’s Fund.

Key results

  • Risk for acute pancreatitis increased with higher BMIs compared with a BMI of 18.5-24.9 kg/m2, based on multivariable-adjusted HR.
    • BMI 25-29.9 kg/m2: HR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.1-1.8.
    • BMI 30-34.9 kg/m2: HR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.6-2.9.
    • BMI ≥35 kg/m2: HR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.8-4.3.
  • The association between BMI and pancreatitis risk was mediated by triglycerides 29% (P=.001) in an age- and sex-adjusted model and 22% (P=.008) in a multivariable-adjusted model.

Limitations

  • The study was observational and could not establish causality.